Riverdale NJ  973.400.8106 East Hanover NJ 973.585.7954 Wilmington, NC  910-399-8508 Blauvelt, NY 845-680-6023

 

Vaping Is 95% Healthier and 40% Cheaper Than Smoking | Vaping: e-cigarettes safer than smoking, says Public Health England | The American Heart Association Says Vaping Is Safer Than Smoking | Doctors urge the World Health Organization to lighten up on e-cigs

 


Vaping Is 95% Healthier and 40% Cheaper Than Smoking
By Ethan Wolff-Mann - from Time.com
Aug. 20, 2015


The pack-a-day smoker can save around $1,200 per year by vaping.
The CDC and various health organizations don't want to endorse smoking or nicotine consumption in any form, so it's understandable that they've emphasized first and foremost that e-cigarettes are bad for people.
According to a new study published by Public Health
England on Wednesday, however, vaping is actually 95% less harmful than their smoldering counterpart.
The study, which was not funded by the tobacco lobby but rather the U.K.'s Department of Health, also noted that around half of the general public falsely assumed vaporizers and e-cigarettes were as unhealthy as a pack of Lucky's, and that there's no evidence vaporizers lead to smoking. In fact, the report suggested e-cigarettes as a useful tool to help people quit smoking.
What the report doesn't mention is that jumping on the e-cig train could save considerable money compared to traditional smoking. According to NerdWallet, disposable e-cigarettes will mug you an average of $1,387 per year if you're a pack-a-day smoker-considerably less than the $2,569 equivalent yearly cost of the real thing. While it's still enough to make a dent in your budget, the savings could be critical for many, since tobacco use is higher among among people at a lower socioeconomic status.
If you really want to get that cost down, you can sacrifice some convenience and buy a reusable vape with liquid refills, getting the cost down to about $500 to $600 per year-an average savings of over $2,000. Well, it could save you that, plus a couple decades on your life.
Of course, smokers would save the most-and enjoy the best health and longest lives-by kicking the habit in all forms.

 


Vaping: e-cigarettes safer than smoking, says Public Health England
Government body says vaping can make 'significant contribution to endgame of tobacco' and raises concerns about length of licensing process
By James Meikle for the Guardian
Wednesday 19 August 2015 01.57 EDT Last modified on Wednesday 19 August 2015 10.26 EDT


Vaping is safer than smoking and could lead to the demise of the traditional cigarette, Public Health England (PHE) has said in the first official recognition that e-cigarettes are less damaging to health than smoking tobacco.
The health body concluded that, on "the best estimate so far", e-cigarettes are about 95% less harmful than tobacco cigarettes and could one day be dispensed as a licensed medicine in an alternative to anti-smoking products such as patches.
While stressing that e-cigarettes are not free from risk, PHE now believes that e-cigarettes "have the potential to make a significant contribution to the endgame for tobacco".
The message was backed by the government's chief medical officer, Dame Sally Davies, who nevertheless cautioned that "there continues to be a lack of evidence on the long-term use of e-cigarettes". She said they should only be used as a means to help smokers quit.
"I want to see these products coming to the market as licensed medicines. This would provide assurance on the safety, quality and efficacy to consumers who want to use these products as quitting aids, especially in relation to the flavourings used, which is where we know least about any inhalation risks."
The 111-page review raises concerns about the length and cost of the the government's licensing process, which is a key part of the revised strategy to cut tobacco use.
No e-cigarettes have yet been licensed, unlike other nicotine-replacement therapies such as gums, lozenges and patches. Pilot schemes in Leicester and the City of London allow stop-smoking specialists to offer free e-cigarette starter kits, but smokers elsewhere cannot be offered e-cigarettes on prescription.
The Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency began its work in this area more than two years ago, and manufacturers have complained that it costs them millions to go through the process.
Jane Ellison, the public health minister in England, reminded smokers that the best thing they could do to avoid falling victim to the country's number one killer was to quit completely.
"Although we recognise the e-cigarettes may help adults to quit, we still want to protect children from the dangers of nicotine, which is why we have made it illegal for under-18s to buy them," she said.
The review found that almost all of the 2.6 million adults in the UK now thought to be using e-cigarettes are current or former conventional smokers, most using them to help them quit tobacco or to prevent them going back to smoking.
There was no suggestion that the products were a gateway into tobacco smoking, with less than 1% of adults or young people who had never smoked becoming regular cigarette users.
The PHE decision comes after carefully choreographed moves by anti-tobacco campaigners and public health specialists to help move the NHS towards offering better smoking cessation support and to be less negative about e-cigarettes.
Services are being urged to follow those in the north-east of England in offering behavioural support to those wanting to quit tobacco and using e-cigarettes to try to do so.
Smoking kills about 100,000 people a year in the UK, most of those in England where there are thought to be eight million tobacco users. But official figures suggest smoking is now at its lowest prevalence since records started in the 1940s.
Rates are highest in many of the most deprived areas of England, and getting smokers off tobacco is increasingly seen as one of the best ways of reducing health inequalities.
Worryingly for many of those behind the policy change, increasing numbers of people - up to 22%, compared with 8% two years ago - think e-cigarettes are equally or more harmful than tobacco. This is leading some smokers to avoid switching, studies have suggested.
Tobacco reduction campaigners say the public needs to be educated to recognise that although e-cigarettes, like tobacco cigarettes, contain addictive nicotine, they do not contain more dangerous chemicals such as tar and arsenic.
PHE is also advocating careful monitoring of the e-cigarette market, particularly of companies closely involved with or part of big tobacco companies. It says the government must meet its obligations "to protect public health policy from commercial and other vested interests of the tobacco industry".
Kevin Fenton, director of health and wellbeing at PHE, said: "E-cigarettes are not completely risk-free but when compared to smoking, evidence shows they carry just a fraction of the harm.
Vaping is ever more popular, but is it a smoking cure or a new hazard?
"The problem is people increasingly think they are at least as harmful and this may be keeping millions of smokers from quitting. Local stop-smoking services should look to support e-cigarette users in their journey to quitting completely."
Peter Hajek, of Queen Mary University, London, one of the independent authors of the review, said: "My reading of the evidence is that smokers who switch to vaping remove almost all the risks smoking poses to their health. Smokers differ in their needs and I would advise them not to give up on e-cigarettes if they do not like the first one they try. It may take some experimentation with different products and e-liquids to find the right one."
Ecita, a trade association of e-cigarette manufacturers, said: "There could be huge long-term benefits to taxpayers and the NHS as well as to former smokers and their families. The proposed ban in public places across Wales is very worrying, as are many of the bans in pubs and restaurants across the UK. This appears to be driving a growing number of people to think the harm is the same, deterring smokers from moving to e-cigarettes, and damaging public health."
The smokers group Forest questioned whether prescribing e-cigarettes on the NHS would be a justifiable use of taxpayers' money. Simon Clark, its director, said promoting them "as a state-approved smoking cessation aid ignores the fact that many people enjoy vaping in its own right and use e-cigs as a recreational not a medicinal product."
He said e-cigarettes had been successful because the consumer, not the state, was in charge. "If they want more smokers to switch to e-cigarettes, public health campaigners should embrace consumer choice and oppose unnecessary restrictions on the sale, marketing and promotion of this potentially game-changing product."
The switch in policy towards e-cigarettes coincided with publication in the Journal of the American Medical Association of research from Los Angeles suggesting that high school students who had use e-cigarettes are more likely to go on to try tobacco.
But Hajek said this did not show that vaping leads to smoking. "It just shows that people who are attracted to e-cigarettes are the same people who are attracted to smoking. People who drink white wine are more likely to try red wine than people who do not drink alcohol."


The American Heart Association Says Vaping Is Safer Than Smoking
Written by
Jason Koebler
Staff Writer
August 25, 2014 // 04:35 PM EST


The American Heart Association isn't known for being all that into smoking. But vaping? It can get down with it, in certain cases.
The group has taken a remarkably measured stance on e-cigarettes, suggesting in a lengthy statement this weekend that the technology could help smokers quit, and refraining from outright condemning the tech, like other organizations have.
It's something of a win for the industry, which is expected to top $5 billion in revenues this year. At every turn, health groups and politicians have taken shots at vaping and the companies who make e-liquid, suggesting that they are every bit as dangerous as cigarettes, despite there being some evidence (and the common sense-argument) that they're leaps and bounds safer than combustibles.
The AHA had avoided making any sort of statement until now. In a 20-page policy paper, the association cites research that suggests vaping is less dangerous than smoking and suggests it can be used as a smoking cessation aid.
"E-cigarettes either do not contain or have lower levels of several tobacco-derived harmful and potentially harmful constituents compared with cigarettes and smokeless tobacco," it states. E-cigarettes also "present an opportunity for harm reduction if smokers use them as substitutes for cigarettes."
That's not to say that the AHA wholeheartedly endorses the use of e-cigarettes. Like many other health organizations (and like some in the industry itself), the group suggests that e-cigs should be regulated much like tobacco products are now, and it also cites the oft-stated worry that e-cigs could "renormalize" tobacco use and serve as a gateway for children and teens to get into smoking.
Those worries were to be expected, coming from a group that has spent decades trying to get people to quit smoking. But the levelheadedness of the policy statement overall has to be seen as a win for vapers and e-cigarette companies-it would have been easy for the organization to condemn e-cigarettes outright.
Instead, the group said that more longitudinal and long-term studies on their effects are needed (an idea that few would disagree with), and that secondhand exposure to e-cig vapors is likely to be much less dangerous than exposure to tobacco smoke.
The AHA said that it supports FDA regulation of e-cigarettes, but that it doesn't want the regulations dominated by "major US cigarette manufacturers," who could "promote dual use to sell more conventional cigarettes" and could "steer e-cigarette users to combustible products and thereby increase rather than recreate nicotine and tobacco addiction."
That's not an unfounded fear, either, as big tobacco has spent millions lobbying to make the barrier to entry so high in the e-cig market that the small companies pushing innovation in the space will be smoked out.
Finally, the group suggested that e-cigarettes should be taxed enough so as to discourage children from buying them, "while retaining or increasing differentials with combustible products by increasing taxes on combustibles." In other words: Tax smokers more, tax vapers less.
The move puts the AHA in the company of the FDA, which, earlier this year, suggested that it's certainly not a good thing to encourage people to take up vaping-but admitted that the habit is most likely much safer than smoking.


Doctors urge the World Health Organization to lighten up on e-cigs

Written by Daniel Cooper

May 29th 2014

The World Health Organization suspects that e-cigarettes should be treated with the same regulatory scorn as Tobacco, even if it hasn't yet made this conclusion legally binding. A group of 53 doctors, however, are now urging the WHO to take a gentler approach. They've signed an open letter admitting that while the dangers of vaping aren't fully known, the technology is vastly preferable to people choking down on the real thing. One of the signatories, Professor Robert West, can back up his claims with the study he published last week, which says that e-cigs are much more effective at getting people to quit than patches or cold turkey. We're expecting a lot more back-and-forth on this matter in the next few months, since the WHO's anti-smoking treaty group doesn't meet to reveal its final decision on the vaping issue until mid-October.

May the Vape be with you...

 


vaping supplies and vape products vaping supplies and vape products see our vape juice and huge supply of Vape flavors Vaping supplies on sale and cheap vaping equipment

 

 

More Information

 

About Us
Privacy Policy
Contact:
Riverdale NJ 973-400-8106 | East Hanover NJ 973-585-7954 | Wilmington, NC 910-399-8508 | Blauvelt, NY 845-680-6023

Products sold by Darth Vapor are Intended for sale to adults 19 years or older. If you are not legally able to purchase tobacco products in the state where you live, please exit this site.

Copyright Darth Vapor

 Design by Monarch Optimizing